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Nyala hunting in South Africa – Bowhunting and Rifle hunting methods

Nyala hunting in South Africa

Learn more about Nyala hunting in South Africa. Bowhunting, Rifle hunting, and general info included.

You will get specific details about bowhunting and rifle hunting methods.

At Clearwater Safaris, we have 27 species roaming free. Springbuck, Buffalo, Giraffe, Gemsbok (Oryx), Kudu and many more..

Nyala Characteristics

Latin Name:  Tragelaphus Angasii

Weight (Female) : 55 – 68 kg

Weight (Male):  92 – 126 kg

Breeding:  A single young is born anytime during the year (peaks in August – December), gestation period ± 7 months.

Gestation Period:  8 months

No of Young:  1 calf

Birth Weight:  5 kg

Horns:  64 cm (record – 84 cm)

Bow Hunting a Nyala in South Africa

Equipment information

A minimum arrow velocity:  245 fps is suggested

A minimum arrow weight: 380 grains (gr) is suggested

Draw weight: Equal to or greater than 55 lb

Broad heads:     Minimum of 100 grains (gr) to 125 grains (gr)

A cut on contact fixed 3-blade broad head

Rage II mechanical broad head

A fixed blade 2-blade broad head with bleeders

Bow hunting Nyala - Shot placement

On a quartering to shot it is recommended that you place the arrow midway between the angle formed by the front legs, where the neck joins the brisket.  This placement is only recommended to experienced bow hunters and is extremely risky.

On a broadside place the shot right behind the shoulder of the Nyala in line with the front leg, 1/3 up from the bottom of the chest to the top of the back.  This should result in the least amount of expiring time as the shot placement should be in a high heart/lung position.

On a quartering away shot care should be taken not to attempt to have the arrow penetrate through too much stomach content. Place the arrow in a spot bisecting the angle formed by the front legs into a position one third of the way up from the bottom of the brisket to the top of the back.

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Rifle Hunting a Nyala

Equipment information

Rifles of less that .270 cannot be recommended; the .270 with a heavy for caliber bullet and good shot placement will certainly get the job done. The various 30 calibers, would be an even better choice to anchor your nyala. Shot placement, as always, is critical; straight up the fore-leg about one third into the body – and never above the one half mark – will secure the high heart/lung shot which has proved to be so effective.

Hunting Nyala in South Africa

Nyala Information

The nyala is a spiral-horned and middle-sized antelope, between a bushbuck and a kudu.[15] It is considered the most sexually dimorphic antelope.[2] The nyala is typically between 135–195 cm (53–77 in) in head-and-body length.[2] The male stands up to 110 cm (43 in), the female is up to 90 cm (3.0 ft) tall. Males weigh 98–125 kg (216–276 lb), while females weigh 55–68 kg (121–150 lb). Life expectancy of the nyala is about 19 years.[16]

The coat is rusty or rufous brown in females and juveniles. It grows a dark brown or slate grey in adult males, often with a bluish tinge.[2] Females and young males have ten or more white vertical stripes on their sides. Other markings are visible on the face, throat, flanks and thighs. Stripes are very reduced or absent in older males. Both males and females have a white chevron between their eyes, and a 40–55 cm (16–22 in) long bushy tail white underside. Both sexes have a dorsal crest of hair running right from the back of the head to the end of the tail. Males have another line of hair along the midline of their chest and belly.[16][17]

Only the males have horns. Horns are 60–83 cm (24–33 in) long and yellow-tipped. There are one or two twists.[2] The spoor is similar to that of the bushbuck, but larger. It is 5–6 cm (2.0–2.4 in) long. The feces resemble round to spherical pellets.[18] The nyala has hairy glands on its feet, which leave their scent wherever it walks.[3]

Image credits: Wikipedia

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